Pei-Yao Hung
Human-Computer Interaction Researcher

Researcher and Builder

Empower People with Information and Smart Environment

peiyaoh@umich.edu,,
C.V., Google Scholar

I am a Ph.D. candidate in the University of Michigan School of Information, advised by Dr. Mark S. Ackerman. My major research interests include Human-Computer Interaction, Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Ubiquitous Computing, and End-User Programming. I am interested in designing systems to empower people with different backgrounds in their everyday pursuits. Projects I've worked on help people to develop fine motor skills, make health decisions, enrich their community interactions online, develop independence, and foster team collaborations.

I employ different methods to study human experience in both digital and physical environments, such as analyzing browsing history, observing occupational therapy sessions, conduct co-design sessions with patients, and conducting semi-structured interviews to understand patients, caregivers, and clinicians' care-receiving and caregiving experiences.

Built on my understanding of the experiences of different stakeholders, I design, build, and evaluate interactive systems on desktop, mobile, and web platforms to explore the potentials of interactive systems to make people's everyday life better and exciting. I am privileged to have worked with domain experts such as software developers, occupational therapists, public health researchers, physicians, caregivers, and patients, to co-create better user experience.

I am a member of the SocialWorlds research group and the Michigan Interactive and Social Computing (MISC) group. I received BS and MS in Computer Science and Information Engineering from National Taiwan University, Taiwan, and a MS in Information from the University of Michigan.

He has assisted in teaching graduate and undergraduate courses as a graduate student instructor (GSI) at the School of Information.
Research
Supporting Informal Healthcare Teams at Home

Being seriously injured with neurological impairments, such as spinal cord injuries, might require a team of people (the care team), including family, paid assistants, and clinicians, to assist with everyday activities. We seek to design sensor-based mobile platforms and tools for supporting the collaboration among care team members to achieve desired health outcomes.

Status: on-going, published

Details

Should I Screen? Lung Cancer Screening Decision Aid

Lung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Screening for lung cancer has only been recommended recently and the benefits, harms, and eligibility criteria, are not well understood by the general public. We designed a dual language (English and Spanish) online decision aid for people and doctors to consult with during the shared decision-making process for lung cancer screening.

Status: on-going, published

Details

Discount Expertise Metrics for Augmenting Community Interaction

Expertise identification is important for various kinds of online and offline organizations, with practical applications such as supporting question answering, problem-solving, and team formation. Using developers as the target population, we demonstrate that it is possible to identify novices and experts of programming by examining the types of programming related websites they visit.

Status: published

Details

Enjoyable Training to Improve Visual-Motor Integration for Preschool Children with Autism

Some children with autism lack visual-motor integration ability. Traditional treatment activities are often time-consuming and thus prevent extensive training. We designed a computer game, called CuttingGame, to create a playful experience that both assesses and trains children in visual-motor integration to assist occupational therapists and the children.

Status: published

Details